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Over the last several blogs, we’ve been discussing various aspects of charity.  Let’s continue the discussion by looking at the situation at the southern border where a massive number of children are entering the country.  It is a dire situation, which is likely to grow worse, and a case has been presented by some that we have a duty to support and care for all of these children.  Who could argue that it is not right to provide help for another human being?  Many liberals are, of course, demanding that public monies be expended to help them all.  But is this the right action?  Is this what we’ve been called to do?  Is this charity as some have presented it?

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Posted in: Charity
28

A question was posed in the last post.  Are those who choose to live ‘on the dole’ the problem or simply the result of something else?  That is the question we’ll look at this time.  Government sets public policy, but as stated previously the primary role of government is the administration of the virtue of justice.  That can only happen when those who lead do so out of a sense of service to others.  From the book of Mark, ‘If anyone wants to be first, he shall be last of all and servant of all.’  This requires the virtues of humility and righteousness.  But these are not enough.  Leaders must also be oriented toward their society’s fulfilling its purpose as both individuals and a people.  That cannot be found within any form of collectivism as it breeds dependence.

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Posted in: Charity
29
Still not convinced by the previous posts?  As stated earlier, welfare payments are viewed as a foundational means of transferring wealth between members of a society by those who believe in collectivism to achieve the goal of social justice.  But what of the fruits of this approach – what does it produce for a society or its people?  Are people made more independent or more dependent?  Dependence serves to decrease ones choices, but it is our making choices which leads to us achieving our purpose.  Therefore, an action which increases independence, or lessens dependence, serves to increase our ability to achieve our purpose.  Let’s take a specific example from today to see how well our current policies align with our purpose.  Jason Greenslate is a twenty-nine year old from San Diego who is pursuing his dream of becoming a rock star.  There is no problem with that in and of itself.  We should all use our talents as they are the means by which we fulfill our purpose.  However, it is not just the goal itself that matters, but also how a goal is achieved matters.  The choices we make in reaching a goal define who we are, and who we become – and whether we achieve our purpose.

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Posted in: Charity
27
The previous post started to discuss the inconsistency that collectivists have regarding the use of redistributed wealth by those who receive it – that it will be used for its intended purpose.  One of the main arguments for government forced redistribution is that people who have wealth will not do the right things with it.  On the other hand, collectivists assume that those who receive the redistributions will do the right things with them, or at least will be better stewards of what they receive than those from whom it came.  Why else would a redistribution be warranted unless it were to be used for some greater good?  Otherwise a redistribution is simply legalized theft.  The assertion underlying wealth redistributions implies that virtue among those receiving the redistribution is greater than those whose wealth is redistributed.  During the Middle Ages, the general view was that those who accumulated wealth possessed greater virtues related to physical things (stewardship, frugality, etc.), while those who were poor possessed greater spiritual virtues (piety, humility, etc.).  It was not thought that one group’s virtue was greater than the other; but rather that the virtues they possessed were merely different – neither was better than the other.

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Posted in: Stewardship
04

There is a relationship between the other two points from the previous post:  those around the government’s role in achieving a fair distribution of society’s wealth, and whether people will do the rights things with the redistributed wealth they receive.  At the heart of this matter is the answer to the following question, ‘Who is best able to direct society’s resources, its individuals or its government?’ – for its answer is directly connected to charity.  Historically, until somewhat recently, charity has consisted of providing things such as bread, food, shelter, care for those unable to care for themselves (widows, orphans, aged, and the dying), and debt relief.  Charity is about service and providing sacrificially, simply because another is in need, and throughout the Middle Ages there was a direct connection between the giver and the receiver.

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Posted in: Stewardship
28

In the last post we made the point that we often use money as though it is a significant part of a solution.  We throw money at everything from education, to various forms of welfare, to the war on drugs, to developing alternative energy sources.  However, many times it seems that money is more closely related to the problem.  It is spent and there is either no effect or a problem often worsens.  Why?  Take social justice.  The whole idea underlying social justice is the notion that problems will be solved simply by a ‘fairer’ distribution of wealth – accomplished by the transfer of wealth from those who have to those who do not, with the determination of who has and who needs left to the discretion of a ruling elite.  The underlying belief is that it is morally wrong to accumulate wealth for the sake of wealth itself, and there is truth in this notion.  However, money is just a tool.  It is fungible, meaning that it can be used for many things.  It can be used well, or it can be used badly. 

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Posted in: Stewardship
15

As discussed in the last post, stewardship is about using your gifts and abilities well, not only for oneself, but for others as well.  Committing to that kind of stewardship, and acting upon it, is agape – the kind of love that finds its expression in charity.  Charity is about providing to those in need what they need.  This is much broader than the focus we have today on simply providing for the poor.  It is within that broader focus that we find a relationship between stewardship and education.

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Posted in: Stewardship
21
We’ve mentioned several times the concept of stewardship, but what exactly is it?  If we look at a dictionary today we’ll likely see something like this, ‘the employment or use of one’s time, talents, or abilities.’  It is a definition focused on us, but I would suggest that this focus is a relatively recent development. As an example, we have no further to look than the titles of some of our leading magazines over the last seventy years or so, as they are a reflection of our society.  At the beginning of that time span we had publications like Time and Life, and they did quite well.  Fast forward to the early 70’s and we first had People, and a mere ten years after that we had Us and Self.  Notice the progression?  It is no different from many of our other basic concepts and ideas, including stewardship.  We’ve ‘progressed’ from being fascinated by the big picture of things outside of ourselves, to one absorbed with ourselves.  Don’t get me wrong.  There is nothing wrong with self-examination, if it is balanced with a valid objective.  That objectivity within individualism is provided by a set of virtues and a given morality.  Within collectivism that objectivity is provided by the dictates of the state.

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Posted in: Stewardship
17

I will present two arguments.  The first will be a logical one.  Its basis is that, at its core, collectivism believes that all people are not created equal – or more precisely that some are created more equal than others.  This is captured by both Plato’s and Aristotle’s thoughts on the relationship between the state, education, and citizenship.  Their relevant thoughts can be summarized as follows:

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Posted in: Education
06

Plato viewed society as being comprised of four levels, those who were either:  gold (those who governed, the guardians), silver (those who supported the guardians), brass (artisans and laborers), or iron (farmers).  The many slaves were not considered.  Aristotle had more divisions, but his approach was basically the same.  The structure of these societies resembled a pyramid.  The guardians were the smallest group, their assistants larger in number, and finally by far the largest segment of the population consisted of the remaining groups.  These views were not uncommon in state religion societies like Rome and Greece. 

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Posted in: Education
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About Dan Wolf

Dan WolfMy goal is that my writing will help you to get started on your own journey of discovery, or help you along the way on a journey you may have already begun. Our Founders considered education, religion, morality, and virtue to be the cornerstones for any successful society. Being successful requires understanding both the languages of reason and faith; reason alone is insufficient.